Our mission

Cold Facts supports scientific research in the Polar Regions and shares scientific insights as a way to promote fact based perspectives on these changing environments.

View our video of the latest missions: CryoVEx 2014 and Snow- and ice thickness

Read more about Cold Facts

Our Technology

Ultra Lightweight Weather Station

Understanding how sea ice is formed and driven by wind and sea currents is important to forecast future trends and regional ice regimes. Under coordination of the University of Washington the International Arctic Buoy Programme is doing important work in this area.

In contribution to this program Cold Facts’ founder Marc Cornelissen has been driving the development of an ultra lightweight weather station capable of monitoring meteorological conditions as well as sea ice dynamics. After ten years, a mature design is produced and field-tested. This weather station or so called ‘drifting buoy’ follows the sea ice during it’s journey and annual cycle of melt and refreezing. This journey can take up to three years or more and daily distances of 50 kilometres have been recorded.

 

 

Focus on the Future

The Last Ice Area

In March and April 2014 polar explorers Petter Nyquist (Norway) and Marc Cornelissen (The Netherlands) will head for the high Arctic with two expeditions to complete. Both aim at gathering valuable datasets for scientific research on sea ice and take place in the so-called ‘Last Ice Area’.  This is the area where summer sea ice covers is expected to be most resilient to warming and is anticipated to remain for decades to come.

Anticipating on this resilience the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) has identified this region as an area for which special stewardship should be sought through consultation of and cooperation with stakeholders.

 

 

 

Our Legacy

Using a carefully and cooperatively developed set of tools and methods, Cold Facts seeks a connection with existing research programmes. The actual use of the collected data is, after all, the work of dedicated scientists. They have access to the necessary infrastructure and expertise. Cold Facts is based on the principle of “Feed In”, feeding into existing research activities and does not aspire to be a research programme in itself.

To increase it's potential Cold Facts will aim for a long-term program that extends beyond the duration and scope of a single project, as this is the way to create meaningful datasets. Observations over longer time frames and increased spatial resolution increase their scientific value. This will be achieved by facilitating polar travelers who have shown an increased interest to integrate scientific activities in their expeditions.

 


Expeditions

CryoVEx 2014

17 March - 04 April
Led by: Marc Cornelissen

Snow- and ice thickness

05 April - 20 March
Led by: Marc Cornelissen

Greenland Ice Cap

25 April - 04 May
Led by: Philip de Roo

Show all expeditions

Marc Cornelissen

Cold Facts was initiated by Dutch polar explorer Marc Cornelissen and received start-up funding via the Dutch World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF Netherlands), an organization with which he has cooperated for more than a decade.

Over the years Marc Cornelissen gained much experience with the cooperation model that Cold Facts implements. The climate research expedition Pole Track (2004-2005) and the Climate Change College (2006-2008) have resulted in a valuable network, experience and lessons learned. Together with leading scientists and institutions suitable protocols and instruments have been developed and tested. 

To increase their potential Cold Facts will aim for a long-term program that extends beyond the duration and scope of a single project, as this is the way to create meaningful datasets. Observations over longer time frames and increased spatial resolution increase their scientific value. This will be achieved by facilitating polar travelers who have shown an increased interest to integrate scientific activities in their expeditions.

Back to top

© 2014 Coldfacts.org · Privacy · Terms